About

While he doesn’t recall exactly when he attended his first yoga class, Peter Nikolaidis is pretty sure it was sometime in the early 2000s.

Maybe the late 90s.

Okay, he really doesn’t remember, but it was a while ago.

In 2011, while unable to continue his usual practice of martial arts due to an injury, he turned to yoga to fill in the gap. Over time, yoga shifted to become more of a central component to his everyday life. 

In 2018, after training in Yin Yoga with Holland Sweeney since 2015, Peter embarked on his RYT-500 certification, pursuing the RYT-200 with Jenna Palm and the 300 hour Teacher Training Certification in Yin Yoga and Meditation with Josh Summers.

Peter currently  teaches Yin Yoga in at Karma Yoga Studio in Cambridge, Alpha Krav Maga Malden, and at his home in Medford, MA. He can be found practicing most often at The Corner Studio in Medford.

Peter with Josh Summers and Terry Cockburn at Spirit Fire
Peter (center) with Josh Summers (left) and Terry Cockburn (right) at Spirit Fire in 2018

About Yin Yoga

From Wikipedia:

Yin yoga is a slow-paced style of yoga with postures, or asanas, that are held for longer periods of time—for beginners, it may range from 45 seconds to two minutes; more advanced practitioners may stay in one asana for five minutes or more.

Yin yoga poses apply moderate stress to the connective tissues of the body—the tendons, fascia, and ligaments—with the aim of increasing circulation in the joints and improving flexibility. A more meditative approach to yoga, yin aims at cultivating awareness of inner silence, and bringing to light a universal, interconnecting quality.

Yin yoga’s teaching in the Western world, beginning in the late 1970s, was founded by martial arts expert and Taoist yoga teacher Paulie Zink. Yin yoga is now being taught across North America and in Europe, due in large part to the teaching activities of Yin yoga teachers and developers Paul Grilley and Sarah Powers.Yin yoga as taught by Paul Grilley and Sarah Powers is not intended as a complete practice in itself, but rather as a complement to more active forms of yoga and exercise. However, Paulie Zink’s approach includes the full range of Taoist yoga, both yin and yang, and is intended to be a complete practice in itself.